The myth of the ‘securitised Muslim community’

The social impact of post-9/11 counter-terrorist law and policy in the west

Authored by: Steven Greer

Routledge Handbook of Law and Terrorism

Print publication date:  July  2015
Online publication date:  July  2015

Print ISBN: 9780415870375
eBook ISBN: 9780203795835
Adobe ISBN: 9781134455096

10.4324/9780203795835.ch26

 Download Chapter

 

Abstract

The academic literature broadly concerned with the ‘social impact’ of post-9/11 terrorism and counter-terrorism in the west is dominated by ‘the securitisation thesis’, at least eight different senses of which are typically employed by exponents in an interchangeable, confused, and muddled manner. 2 It is said that: (i) Muslims as a whole feel under suspicion from society merely because they are Muslim; (ii) Muslims as a whole have fallen under suspicion from society for the same reason; (iii) Islam has fallen under suspicion from society; (iv) Muslims as a whole feel under suspicion from the state solely on account of being Muslim; (v) Muslims as a whole have fallen under suspicion from the state merely because they are Muslim; (vi) Islam has fallen under suspicion from the state; (vii) Muslims as a whole are subject to special security and criminal justice measures purely because they are Muslim; and (viii) Islam is subject to special security and criminal justice measures not applicable to other faiths or ideologies. However, much more careful distinctions need to be drawn between these claims, not only for analytical reasons, but also because there will otherwise be little hope of solving the social and political problems alleged.

 Cite
Search for more...
Back to top

Use of cookies on this website

We are using cookies to provide statistics that help us give you the best experience of our site. You can find out more in our Privacy Policy. By continuing to use the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.